Articles Posted in Grounds for Removal

Attorney Charles Ward has been a long time attorney at the Law Offices of Jacob J. Sapochnick. Charles received his Doctorate in Jurisprudence from Southern Methodist University graduating Cum Laude. He has been a California licensed attorney since 1997 and is also licensed to practice before the Federal Court system. His area of expertise includes Immigration and Family Law. Charles Ward is a stand-out member of our team and is known for his professionalism, compassion, infectious laughter, and colorful personality.

At the Law Offices of Jacob J. Sapochnick Charles handles cases that are in removal proceedings, including Asylum, Adjustment of Status, and Voluntary Departure. Mr. Ward also helps clients prepare for courtroom hearings, trials, green card interviews, fraud interviews, citizenship interviews, and much more. Mr. Ward is an active member of the San Diego County Bar Association and served as President of the “Small Firms & Solo Practitioners” section.

Outside of the office, Charles enjoys swimming in the ocean, hiking, traveling, and going to sporting events.

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In this video, attorney Jacob J. Sapochnick discusses the future of immigration law under President elect Donald Trump. For more information just keep on watching.

Overview: 

Donald Trump is set to become the next President of the United States on January 20, 2017. Due to his polarizing stance on immigration, many Americans are living in fear of deportation, while others ask themselves: how might immigration law change under the Donald Trump administration? The good news is that in recent interviews Donald Trump has dramatically scaled back his views on immigration, stating that he will prioritize the deportation of criminal persons residing in the country illegally which he estimates will affect about 3 million undocumented immigrations, although he continues to maintain that a wall must be built along the U.S. Mexico border. In terms of high skilled immigration, he has been highly critical of work visa programs such as the H-1B program. He has stated that Americans should have the opportunity to fill occupations being offered to foreign nationals first.

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In this video, attorney Jacob J. Sapochnick Esq. answers one of your frequently asked questions: I overstayed my visa and I am now married to a U.S. Citizen. Am I eligible for a green card?

Overview: 

I am married to a US Citizen but I came to the United States over 10 years ago, I overstayed my visa. Am I eligible to apply for a green card?

The good news is, even if you have overstayed or worked in the United States illegally,  if you are married to a US Citizen it is possible to legalize and apply for permanent residence. The key to determine your eligibility lies in the manner in which you entered the United States. To be eligible for permanent residence, you must have been inspected by a U.S. Customs Official at a U.S. Port of entry. In other words, you must have entered the United States legally and received an I-94 record of arrival/departure proving that you were inspected upon entry. If all goes well, the immigration officer will waive the overstay and illegal employment, at the time of your marriage interview if you can prove that you were inspected by showing your I-94. Any other grounds of inadmissability such as certain crimes, fraud, or willful misrepresentation may subject you to a bar for a certain period of time. In these circumstances, you will need to obtain a waiver before applying for permanent residence.

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In this video, attorney Jacob J. Sapochnick answers one of your most frequently asked questions: I have a minor US Citizen child. Can I get a green card?

Overview:

This is a very common question. This question comes to us from a Chinese national who is currently in the United States on an H-1B Visa. This person asks: Can I get a green card based on the fact that I have a minor US Citizen child that was just born in the US?

In this situation because the child is under the age of 21, your child cannot file a petition for permanent residence on your behalf based on the fact that you have a minor child born in the United States. This is a very common misconception. Your child can only file for your immigration benefits once they reach the age of 21. A child must be at least 18 years old in order to petition for immigration benefits for their siblings, and then the sibling must wait for a visa number to become available based on the visa bulletin. You cannot obtain a green card just by having a US Citizen child. If you are in the United States on a visa you must find another way to remain legally in the United States until the US Citizen child reaches the minimum age or find another way to obtain a green card through employment. Parents of US Citizen children, residing in the United States unlawfully, can obtain cancelation of removal for their parents to shield them from deportation/removal proceedings. In this case the child does not need to be 21 years or older.

For more information about this topic please contact our office.

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In this segment, attorney Jacob J. Sapochnick answers one of your most frequently asked questions: What are some ways to obtain relief from deportation?

Overview:

There are generally four ways to obtain relief from deportation through Cancellation of Removal, Prosecutorial Discretion, Asylum, or Adjustment of Status.

  • Cancellation of removal is a good option for people who have resided in the United States for 10+ years;
  • Asylum is a good option to avoid removal for those who qualify. In order to qualify, an asylum applicant must be unable or unwilling to return to their home country as a result of persecution or well-founded fear of persecution on the basis of five statutorily protected grounds including: race, religion, nationality, membership in a particular social group, or political opinion;
  • Adjustment of status is an option for those who have an immediate relative that is a United States Citizen or Lawful Permanent Resident (LPR). These individuals may adjust their status to lawful permanent residence;
  • Another way is through Prosecutorial Discretion;

For more information please contact us for a free consultation.

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In this segment, attorney Jacob J. Sapochnick discusses the I-601A waiver and when it may be used to legalize a foreign spouse. In this case the foreign spouse was removed for a 3-year period.

For more information about the I-601 and I-601A waivers please click here.

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In this segment, attorney Jacob J. Sapochnick discusses one of our most frequently asked questions: I have married a different petitioner than the one who filed my K-1 fiancé visa, can I still apply for my green card?

Overview

– The K-1 fiancé visa allows you to marry only the original US citizen petitioner that filed your K-1 fiancé visa

–The K-1 fiancé visa does not allow you to enter the United States and later adjust your status to permanent residence within the United States, while married to a different person

– It is possible for you to proceed with an adjustment of status from your home country, if you have now married a different person than the one who petitioned for your K-1 fiancé visa, through a process known as consular processing

–Couples who are concerned about the impact of physical separation on their relationship may consider the K-3 visa as an alternative to consular processing

–If you have accrued unlawful presence in the United States you will be subject to a bar and will need to file a waiver before applying for permanent residence

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In this episode, attorney Jacob J. Sapochnick Esq. discusses the removal process following detention.

– Following your detention, you have the right to fight your case, you cannot just be kicked out without due process of law

– In most cases, unless there is an outstanding order of removal in your file, you have the right to defend your case in immigration court

– A Notice to Appear (NTA) must be issued to you by Homeland Security. The NTA signals the initiation of removal proceedings against you

For further questions please call our office.

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In this episode attorney Jacob Sapochnick, Esq. answers questions regarding deportation including who can be deported from the United States and what the grounds are for removal proceedings.

– having a green card or visa does not mean you cannot be removed

– these rights depend entirely on the person following certain rules and avoiding certain types of legal violations

– US citizens cannot be removed unless they use fraud to gain citizenship

 

For questions and legal advice please call our office for a free legal consultation.

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