Articles Posted in Parole

In this video, attorney Jacob Sapochnick explains the potential problems that may arise when an immigrant who has overstayed the Visa Waiver Program later applies for adjustment of status based on their marriage to a US citizen.

In this case study, we discuss a real situation involving a client who initially came to the United States on the visa waiver program. Per the terms of the Visa Waiver Program, a foreign national may only remain in the United States for a period of 90 days or less.

Our client had remained in the United States unlawfully for a long period of time. During the period of time he remained in the United States unlawfully, he met and married a U.S. Citizen and began a life with his American spouse in the United States. The couple filed an application for adjustment of status after the marriage, thinking that they would be approved without a problem. Unfortunately this application was denied, and a subsequent motion to re-open the case was also denied. In San Diego county and other immigration field offices, immigration officers began to aggressively deny adjustment of status applications for immigrants who had overstayed the visa waiver program, even if the application was based on marriage to a U.S. Citizen spouse. The client then decided to re-file his application for permanent residence after the denial. After filing, the Border Patrol apprehended him and began the process of deporting him from the United States. Understandably this was a very difficult situation for the client and his American spouse to go through. At this point, the client retained our office to begin prosecutorial discretion to cancel his removal from the United States and to re-file his application for adjustment of status to permanent residence, based on his marriage to his American spouse.

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In this podcast, attorney Jacob J. Sapochnick discusses the all new International Entrepreneur rule. To hear more about this exciting new rule for entrepreneurs, please click below.


What is it?

The International Entrepreneur Rule will allow certain entrepreneurs the opportunity to seek ‘parole’ into the United States, based on his or her role in the startup company, provided the company can demonstrate substantial potential for rapid growth and job creation in the United States. Not all entrepreneurs will be eligible. Qualifying entrepreneurs must demonstrate that their entry would create a significant public benefit in the United States, and provide ‘substantial’ and ‘demonstrated potential’ to create more jobs and business growth in the United States, and not merely provide income to the entrepreneur and his or her family members.

What are the requirements?

Entrepreneurs must demonstrate:

  • At least a 15 percent ownership interest in their startup enterprise;
  • That they take on an active and central role in the startup enterprise’s operations;
  • That the startup enterprise has been formed in the United States within the past three years; and
  • That the startup enterprise has proven to yield a substantial and demonstrated potential for rapid business growth and job creation as evidenced by:
  1. Having received a significant investment of capital of at least $345,000 from certain qualified U.S. investors that have a proven track record of success i.e. showing established records of successful investments;
  2. Having received significant awards or grants of at least $100,000 from federal, state, or local government entities; or
  3. By partially satisfying one or both of the above criteria, in addition to presenting other reliable and compelling evidence to show the startup entity’s substantial potential for rapid growth and job creation in the United States.

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