Articles Posted in Executive Actions

Recently the President of the United States controversially announced that he could end birthright citizenship by executive order.

What is birthright citizenship? The 14th amendment of the U.S. Constitution grants citizenship to all persons born in the United States. This right to citizenship is referred to as “birthright citizenship.” Such a right is granted to an individual born in the United States, irrespective of their parent’s immigration status in the United States.

Unsurprisingly, the President made the suggestion that he could do away with birthright citizenship, ahead of the midterm elections in the United States. The timing of the President’s statement shows that the message was politically motivated.

Does the President have the power to end birthright citizenship? The President cannot end birthright citizenship by executive order. The President’s message was made simply to incite fear in the non-citizen population, and to solidify the President’s support from his conservative base, who believe that “anchor babies,” a derogatory term used to refer to children born in the United States to non-citizen parents, should not be entitled to United States citizenship.

The President is likely aware that he, of course, does not have the power to end birthright citizenship by executive order, and made such a statement to deliberately deceive his base, and create confusion.

This is very troubling, given the state of our current political climate. If the President ever signed such an executive order, it would undoubtedly be met with fierce opposition in court.

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In this video, attorneys Jacob Sapochnick and Marie Puertollano join a live session on Facebook and Youtube to cover the latest in immigration, E-2 visa changes, TN visa updates, as well as tips, tricks, and advice on how to protect yourself amid this changing immigration climate.

Overview: 

Revised NTA Policy and Delayed implementation:

USCIS has revised its NTA policy expanding the class of individuals who may be referred to ICE and issued a Notice to Appear. Under the revised policy, USCIS may now refer cases “with articulated suspicions of fraud to ICE prior to adjudication.” The implementation of this policy has been placed on hold until operational guidance is implemented by immigration.

What will the new policy do?

The new policy prioritizes the removal of aliens who are removable based on criminal or security grounds, fraud or misrepresentation, and aliens subject to expedited removal.

Prioritizes the removal of individuals who:

  • (a) Have been convicted of any criminal offense;
  • (b) Have been charged with any criminal offense that has not been resolved;
  • (c) Have committed acts that constitute a chargeable criminal offense;
  • (d) Have engaged in fraud or willful misrepresentation in connection with any official matter or application before a governmental agency;
  • (e) Have abused any program related to receipt of public benefits;
  • (f) Are subject to a final order of removal, but have not departed; or
  • (g) In the judgment of an immigration officer, otherwise pose a risk to public safety or national security

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In this post, we answer one of your most frequently asked questions: how can you find the right immigration lawyer for you?

You need an immigration lawyer, but how do you find the right one? Watch this video to learn all about what you need to know before hiring an immigration lawyer.

In this video we offer several guidelines that can help you decide on the right immigration lawyer for you.

Referrals

First of all, you may want to begin by asking for a referral from your close network of friends or family members who may have already worked closely with an immigration lawyer. Social media is a great resource to ask for recommendations from your network and look up reviews of immigration attorneys in your area. You should make a list of the attorneys you would like to work with and contact their offices to set up a consultation. Most attorneys offer free first-time consultations. Free consultations are a great opportunity for the client to meet one-on-one with the attorney and see if you have a connection with the attorney and would ultimately like to retain the attorney to work on your particular case.

Flat Fee Considerations

Secondly, it is important for you to find out during your consultation whether the attorney charges a flat rate for his services or whether the immigration attorney bills the client an hourly rate. Most immigration attorneys charge flat rates for their services, but this may not always be the case depending on the type of immigration service you are seeking (for example asylum and removal defense cases may require additional costs). Flat rates are more desirable for clients because you will know up front how much it will cost you to pay for the legal fees associated with your case. This may be a good way to determine whether an attorney is the right one for you.

Come Prepared

Come to the consultation with the attorney prepared. Research the immigration service you are seeking and become informed about the process beforehand so that you can ask the attorney your burning questions and any concerns you may have before starting the filing process. You will want to discuss with your attorney the steps involved in the process, the general plan to achieving success on your application, the hurdles that you may run into during the process, and fallback options if your application is unsuccessful. An attorney who can provide you with the full picture of the legal process will allow you to have greater confidence and peace of mind.

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What’s happening with DACA today?

In this post, attorney Jacob Sapochnick talks all about the state of DACA (Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals) and what you should know as a recipient of DACA.

In September of 2017 the Trump administration announced that it would be ending the DACA program, which allows undocumented immigrants who came to the U.S. as children to live and work in the United States without fear of deportation.

Attorney General Jeff Sessions spoke on behalf of the administration and said that USCIS would not accept new requests for DACA but would allow DACA recipients with work permits expiring between September 2017 and March 5, 2018 to apply for a final 2-year renewal of their status including employment authorization.

This announcement put considerable pressure on Congress to pass legislation before March 5, 2018 to protect Dreamers from deportation.

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26961961_10155987172608766_8750688692100538053_oIt is our great pleasure to announce that on January 12, 2018, our office successfully negotiated the release of Orr Yakobi from the Otay Mesa Detention Center. As previously reported, Orr Yakobi was detained by the United States Customs and Border Protection on January 8th, after he and a friend made a wrong turn that led their vehicle out of the United States and into Mexico.

Yakobi, an Israeli national, was brought to the United States at a young age by his parents and was under the protection of the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program (DACA). Under the conditions of the program, a DACA recipient may not leave the United States unless they have applied for and received a special travel permit from USCIS known as “advance parole” which allows the individual to re-enter the United States without issue. Failure to present an advance parole document will result in the questioning and likely detention of the individual.

Unfortunately for Yakobi, CBP officials refused to consider that his departure was purely accidental. Although Mr. Yakobi explained that he and his friend intended to take the 805 Northbound which would have taken them on their way home, instead of the 805 Southbound, officials still decided to detain him.

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With the help of our outstanding community, members of Congress, and the media, our office had the unique opportunity to advocate for Mr. Yakobi, a soon to be graduate of the University of California, San Diego. We are proud to represent Dreamers like Orr Yakobi, who contribute enormously to our economy, and make our country a better place.

For more information about his release please click here.

For more information about the services we offer please visit our website.

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In this video attorney Jacob J. Sapochnick answers your immigration questions live on Facebook.

Posted by San Diego Immigration Lawyer, Jacob J. Sapochnick on Saturday, February 18, 2017

In this session, Jacob discusses what is new in immigration, and answers your immigration questions relating to applications for permanent residence (I-485 adjustment of status), H-1B visas, citizenship, traveling outside of the United States as a permanent resident, global delays in visa issuance, the future of DACA under the Trump administration, consequences of overstaying your visa, and much more.

Please remember to follow us on FacebookYoutubeTwitter, and Instagram to catch our next live stream. If you have any questions please contact our office or e-mail jacob@h1b.biz.

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En este video, Melina Rodriguez, de la oficina de Jacob Sapochnick habla de las nuevas ordenes ejecutivas firmadas por el Presidente Donald Trump que afectan a los inmigrantes y extranjeros. Para mas informacion sigan el enlace. Como siempre si usted tiene una pregunta migratoria o necesita una consulta legal, llámenos hoy para su primer cita gratuita. Tenemos hispanohablantes para servir a nuestra comunidad hispana.

Ordenes ejecutivas migratorias. ¿Como afectan a los extranjeros?

Posted by San Diego Immigration Lawyer, Jacob J. Sapochnick on Wednesday, February 1, 2017

Para mas informacion sobre los servicios que nuestra oficina ofrece, visite nuestro sitio de web aqui. Es nuestro placer poder contar con su confianza. Nuestro equipo esta aqui para servirles con cualquier incertidumbre.

Recuerde que nos puede encontrar en FacebookYoutubeTwitter, and Instagram.

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In this video attorney Jacob J. Sapochnick provides a recap on what has happened during Donald Trump’s first 50 days as President of the United States.

On Monday March 6, 2017 President Trump signed a new executive order that will restore the travel ban on citizens of 6 Muslim-majority countries for a 90-day period beginning 12:01 a.m. eastern time on March 16, 2017. In addition, the order will restore the travel ban on refugees under the US Refugee Admissions Program and implement a suspension on all decisions for applications for refugee status for a period of 120-days from March 16, 2017.

What you need to know

Beginning March 16, 2017 at 12:01 AM the 90-day ban will be implemented for citizens of Syria, Iran, Libya, Somalia, Sudan, and Yemen who are outside of the United States, who do not have a valid U.S. visa as of the date of the order, or permanent resident card to travel to the United States. Iraq is no longer subject to the travel ban.

President Trump first 50 days in office : reality check!🔥💪😱😱😱🙏

Posted by San Diego Immigration Lawyer, Jacob J. Sapochnick on Saturday, March 11, 2017

What has changed?

1. The executive order removes Iraq from the list of Muslim majority countries, whose citizens will no longer be prevented from seeking admission to the United States.
2. The provision banning the admission of Syrian refugees indefinitely has been removed, although applications for admission will not be decided during the 120-day period
3. Refugees who have already been formally scheduled for transit to the United States by the State Department will not be affected by the 120-day travel ban on refugees
4. No provisions have been added regarding the impact on parole
5. US officials will no longer prioritize religious minorities when considering applications for refugee admission

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In this Facebook live stream, immigration attorneys Jacob J. Sapochnick and Laurel Scott discuss the impact of the President’s Executive Orders, the Ninth Circuit’s refusal to reinstate the travel and refugee ban, and what the future of immigration looks like from here. Don’t forget to like our Facebook page to join in on future Live streams.

Posted by San Diego Immigration Lawyer, Jacob J. Sapochnick on Saturday, February 11, 2017

By federal court order, the Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals, has decided that it will not reinstate President Trump’s Executive Order “Protecting the Nation from Foreign Terrorist Entry into the United States.” This means that the President’s 90-day travel ban of foreign nationals from seven Muslim-majority countries (Syria, Iraq, Iran, Libya, Somalia, Sudan, and Yemen) will no longer be enforced, as well as the 120-day suspension of the U.S. Refugee Admissions Program barring Syrians from seeking refugee admission to the United States. The government is likely to appeal the Ninth Circuit’s decision to the United States Supreme Court or seek a ruling “en banc.”

The Department of Homeland Security and Customs and Border Protection released the following statement, “In accordance with the judge’s ruling, DHS has suspended any and all actions implementing the affected sections of the Executive Order entitled, “Protecting the Nation from Foreign Terrorist Entry into the United States. This includes actions to suspend passenger system rules that flag travelers for operational action subject to the Executive Order.” This means that the Executive Order will no longer bar the entry of immigrant and non-immigrant travelers from the seven Muslim-majority countries (Syria, Iraq, Iran, Libya, Somalia, Sudan, and Yemen) until a Court rules otherwise. 

The United States Citizenship and Immigration Services issued a statement confirming that USCIS will continue to adjudicate and process applications and petitions filed for or on behalf of individuals in the United States, as well as applications and petitions for individuals outside of the United States, and applications for adjustment of status to permanent residence, irrespective of the beneficiary’s country of nationality. 

For more information about these executive orders please contact our office. Remember to follow us on FacebookYoutubeTwitter, and Instagram 

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In this Facebook live stream, attorney Jacob J. Sapochnick discusses the legal significance of the Temporary Restraining Order (“TRO”) issued Friday, February 3, 2017, by a federal judge from the Western District of Washington. The TRO has temporarily suspended all provisions of  the President’s Executive Order entitled “Protecting the Nation from Foreign Terrorist Entry into the United States” nationwide. This means that the travel ban on foreign nationals from the 7 Muslim-majority countries (Syria, Iraq, Iran, Libya, Somalia, Sudan, and Yemen) has been suspended, and the U.S. Refugee Admissions Program has been reinstated. For more information please keep watching.

Travel Ban Blocked by Federal Judge: update Live discussion

Posted by San Diego Immigration Lawyer, Jacob J. Sapochnick on Friday, February 3, 2017

In his ruling, Judge Robart stated that after hearing arguments, the States adequately demonstrated that they have suffered immediate and irreparable harm because of the signing and implementation of the order, and that granting a TRO would be in the public interest. In addition he stated “the Executive Order adversely affects the States’ residents in areas of employment, education, business, family relations, and freedom to travel. These harms extend to the States. . . are significant and ongoing.” A three-judge panel from the Ninth Court Court of Appeals is expected to issue a final ruling on the Executive Order tomorrow.

Since issuance of the TRO, DHS has suspended any and all actions implementing the affected sections of the Executive Order entitled, “Protecting the Nation from Foreign Terrorist Entry into the United States,” including “actions to suspend passenger system rules that flag travelers for operational action subject to the Executive Order.”

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