Articles Posted in Visa Bulletin

In this video attorney Jacob Sapochnick discusses how to complete Form I-130 Petition for Alien Relative. Please keep in mind that this video is not intended to be legal advice. The information provided is for educational purposes only and does not substitute the legal advice of your attorney. If you are filing the I-130 Petition for Alien Relative on your own, you must read the form instructions very carefully or seek the assistance of an attorney who will complete the forms according to your specific situation.

If you are filing for adjustment of status, or for an immigrant visa, based on a qualifying family relationship, your petitioner must sign and complete Form I-130 Petition for Alien Relative to establish that a valid family relationship exists. If the beneficiary of the petition is the spouse of the petitioner, then the beneficiary must complete Form I-130A Supplemental Information for Spouse Beneficiary.

Filing a Form I-130 is only the first step in helping a relative immigrate to the United States. Certain eligible family members must wait until there is a visa number available before they can apply to become a lawful permanent resident.

Who May File Form I-130

U.S. Citizens and lawful permanent residents may file the I-130 on behalf of qualifying relatives.

For more information about adjustment of status please click here.

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In this video attorney Jacob Sapochnick answers your most frequently asked questions regarding the visa bulletin.

Overview:

Family preference and employment immigrant categories are subject to numerical limitations and are divided by preference systems and priority dates on the Visa Bulletin. Applicants who fall under family preference or employment categories must wait in line until a visa becomes available to them in order to proceed with their immigrant visa applications. Once the immigrant’s priority date becomes current according to the Visa Bulletin, the applicant can proceed with their immigrant visa application.

What is a priority date?

priority date is generally the date when your relative or employer properly filed the immigrant visa petition on your behalf with USCIS.

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In this Facebook live stream, attorney Jacob J. Sapochnick discusses your frequently asked immigration questions and the impact of the election on immigration. For more information just keep on watching.

https://www.facebook.com/myimmigrationlawyer/videos/10154709922723766/

Overview: 

The topics covered in this immigration live stream include:

  • The possible cancellation of the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals Program (DACA). Can Donald Trump remove the program?
  • Family Unity and the Visa Bulletin
  • Will anything be done to improve processing times for family visas?
  • What are the requirements for the I-601 waiver? Will I qualify?
  • Options for persons in removal and persons fearing deportation
  • What can we expect to happen with the work visa programs?
  • Will there be more restrictions/security presence at the border?
  • Is this a good time to apply for citizenship?
  • Immigration options for undocumented persons married to a U.S. Citizen and who have U.S. Citizen children
  • Increases in filing fees beginning December 23, 2016
  • Will the diversity visa lottery program be cancelled?
  • Will cases that are currently pending with USCIS be negatively affected by a Trump administration?
  • What will be the impact of Sanctuary Cities? Will Sanctuary Cities protected undocumented immigrants?
  • Can the President ban Muslims from the United States?
  • What can you do to make your voice heard and make a difference?
  • Immigration options for entrepreneurs and more!

Like our Facebook page in order to ask your immigration questions during our next live stream.

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In this segment, attorney Jacob J. Sapochnick tells you all about the visa bulletin. Who is it for? How does it work? Why do we need it? For more information about the visa bulletin, please click here.

Overview: 

What is the Visa Bulletin?

The Visa Bulletin exists due to congressional numerical immigrant visa limitations for family-sponsored and employment-based preference categories established by the Immigration and Nationality Act (INA). The visa bulletin is for foreign nationals wishing to immigrate to the United States through a relative or employer. Family-sponsored preference categories are limited to a minimum of 226,000 visas per year, while employment-based preference categories are limited to a minimum of 140,000 visas per year. The Visa Bulletin is a useful tool for aliens to determine when a visa will become available to them so that they may apply for permanent residence.

You can check the status of a visa number by checking your priority date on the Department of State’s Visa Bulletin published every month. A priority date is the date when your relative or employer properly filed the immigrant visa petition on your behalf with USCIS (Form I-130 Petition for Alien Relative or Form I-140 Immigrant Petition for Alien Worker).

Family-sponsored preference categories

Family based immigrant visas are divided into preference systems and priority dates. This refers to one of the various categories under which an individual qualifies for U.S. residency, and must wait for a visa to become available.

  • First Preference: unmarried sons and daughters of U.S. citizens. This category refers to the adult children of U.S. citizens or those who have reached the age of 21 years prior to issuance of the immigrant visa;
  • Second Preference: a) spouses and children under the age of 21 of U.S. permanent residents; b) unmarried sons and daughters over the age of 21 of U. S. permanent residents;
  • Third Preference: married sons and daughters of U.S. citizens;
  • Fourth Preference: brothers and sisters of adult U.S. citizens.

Employment-sponsored categories

  • First Preference:  Priority Workers:  28.6% of the worldwide employment-based preference level, plus any numbers not required for fourth and fifth preferences.
  • Second Preference:  Members of the Professions Holding Advanced Degrees or Persons of Exceptional Ability:
  • Third Preference:  Skilled Workers, Professionals, and Other Workers
  • Fourth Preference:  Certain Special Immigrants
  • Fifth Preference:  Employment Creation: not less than 3,000 of which reserved for investors in a targeted rural or high-unemployment area, and 3,000 set aside for investors in regional centers (EB-5)

For more information regarding the immigrant process for family members and the Visa Bulletin please click here. For a legal consultation please contact our office to speak with our legal consultants.

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