Articles Posted in Business Plans

In this video attorney Jacob Sapochnick discusses a frequently asked question regarding the E-2 Investor Visa: Are loans or gifts a legitimate source of funds for the E-2 visa?

In order to get an E-2 visa as an investor in the United States, you must demonstrate that you will make a substantial investment in a new business enterprise or an existing business. As part of the application process, you must show the origin of the source of funds for that investment, and the source of those funds must be legitimate. Not all sources of funds will qualify for the E-2 visa. Many of our clients ask whether a gift of funds or a foreign bank loan will qualify as a legitimate source of funding for the E-2 visa.

Overview: 

Are gifts a legitimate source of funds for the E-2 visa?

Yes, provided the investor has possession of the funds, and the funds are irrevocably committed to the investor by the giver of the gift. The person that has given the gift to the investor must provide documentation showing the source of those funds to prove that the funds came from a legitimate source.

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In this video we discuss how you can get an E-1 treaty trader visa without trading actual goods.

Overview:

  • To qualify for an E-1 Treaty Trader Visa you must be a citizen of a treaty trader country involved in international trade
  • You must be coming to the U.S. to carry on substantial trade or to develop and direct the operations of an enterprise that is a commercial trader with your country of nationality
  • The trade must be conducted principally between the U.S. and the treaty country
  • The U.S. enterprise must conduct more than 50% of its total trade volume with the treaty country
  • The trade may be of a good, commodity, services, or technology

If you are the owner of patented technology in your treaty trader country for example you may qualify for the E-1 treaty trader visa. To qualify for the E-1 visa, you do not need to have actual goods coming from the treaty country to the U.S., in this case the E-1 treaty trader visa can be obtained by showing that a form of technology along with the rights will be developed in the U.S.

This was the exact situation of our client, an Israeli national who owned patented technology for physical exercise equipment, designed and licensed in Israel, but produced in China. To overcome the fact that the equipment was produced in China using Israeli technology, our office made sure to establish that the rights to build the products in China had to be approved and signed off by the company in Israel which owned the patent. In addition, our office strengthened the case by furnishing the agreements between the Israeli company and the manufacturing facility in China, to show that although the product was being manufactured in China, the Chinese facility was in fact controlled by an Israeli designer to ensure quality control and compliance with the Israeli technology owned by our client. Finally, we showed that the majority of the funds to finance the operation was coming from Israel, the treaty trader country, and documented how the product would be coming to the United States.

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In this video, attorney Jacob J. Sapochnick, explains the process of applying for an E-2 visa and the steps involved in that process. The E-2 visa is a non-immigrant visa type (temporary) that allows foreign entrepreneurs from treaty nations to enter the United States and carry out investment and trade activities.

Overview: 

The E-2 ‘investor visa’ is available to an applicant who invests a substantial amount of his own money into a U.S. business, which he can control and direct. This visa type is a great option for individuals who wish to invest their money to purchase an existing business or to start up a new one.

In order to qualify for the E-2 visa, you must be a foreign national of a country that has a treaty-trader agreement with the United States.

The following countries have treaties with the United States that allow qualifying nationals to apply for Treaty Trader status:

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In this video, attorney Jacob J. Sapochnick discusses the Final International Entrepreneur Rule recently published by USCIS effective July 17, 2017. Approximately 2,940 foreign entrepreneurs are set to benefit from the new rule on an annual basis beginning July 17.

What will it do?

The rule will make it easier for eligible start-up entrepreneurs to obtain temporary permission to enter the United States for a period of 30 months, or 2.5 years, through a process known as “parole,” for the purpose of starting or scaling their start-up business enterprise in the United States. The decision about whether to “parole” a foreign entrepreneur under this rule will be a discretionary determination made by the Secretary of Homeland Security on a case-by-case basis (INA Section 212(d)(5), 8 U.S.C. 1182(d)(5)).

“Parole” will be granted to eligible entrepreneurs who can demonstrate that their company’s business operations are of significant public benefit to the United States by providing evidence of substantial and demonstrated potential for rapid business growth and job creation. Such demonstrated potential for rapid growth and job creation may be evidenced by: (1) significant capital investment from U.S. investors with established records of successful investments or (2) attainment of significant awards or grants from certain Federal, State, or local government entities.

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In this video, Attorney Jacob J. Sapochnick Esq. discusses one of your frequently asked questions about the E-2 visa program: Is there a minimum investment amount? How can I determine how much money to invest for the E-2 visa?

For more information please keep watching.

Overview: 

The answer is that there is no set standard requirement in the law stating a standard minimum amount of money required to be invested in order to qualify for an E-2 visa. Although there is no minimum investment amount required for E-2 visa investment purposes, as a general rule the investment must be significantly proportional to the amount of the total investment. This means that generally the investment amount must be half the total value of the enterprise, or for new businesses, an amount normally considered necessary to start the business. It is true that some applicants have been approved for the E-2 visa having made investments of less than $100,000, but the appropriate amount you must invest will depend on various factors including: the type of business you will invest in, the location, business plan, whether you plan on opening a new business or investment in an existing business, etc. In order for your application to be convincing, realistically the investment amount should approach $100,000, to increase your chances of getting your E-2 visa approved, but you must take into account that the investment amount will depend upon many different factors.

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In this video, attorney Jacob J. Sapochnick Esq., appears on NBC 7 San Diego News to talk about the EB-5 Investor Program. For more information about the EB-5 visa please click here. For a free first consultation please contact our office.

Overview:

The EB-5 program was started in the 1990s as part of a pilot program designed to bring foreign capital to the United States by encouraging foreign investors to establish a new business venture or invest in a regional center project. Today, the EB-5 program is a special immigration program designed for foreigners who are interested in investing a significant amount of capital in American businesses and industries, that will create thousands of new jobs for Americans. In this interview, attorney Jacob J. Sapochnick Esq. joins Diana Guevara and Interim President and CEO of the San Diego Regional Chamber of Commerce, Mark Leslie to discuss the advantages of participating in the EB-5 program.

Foreigners who have committed a large investment can become lawful permanent residents through this program by establishing a new commercial enterprise. Investors must provide full-time employment to at least ten U.S. citizens, legal permanent residents, or other immigrants with employment authorization.

For more information about this program, please contact our office. 

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In this episode, attorney Jacob J. Sapochnick Esq. answers one of our most frequently asked questions: What are the differences between the L and E visas?

The L visa is a known immigrant visa, which means that L visa holders can apply for a permanent resident card without losing their L status. L visa holders with dependents, can bring those family members via the L-2 visa. The L visa allows the principal L visa holder to bring foreign workers to the United States working for the same company abroad.

E visa’s are based on a treaty trade agreement or treaty investment. They require a substantial investment to be made. E visa holders cannot apply for permanent residence, but this classification is a good option for temporary investors.

For more information on the L and E visas click here.

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In this episode, attorney Jacob J. Sapochnick, discusses one of our most frequently asked questions: What is the importance of Business Plans for E-visas and how can they improve an E-visa application?

For further questions please call our office.

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