Articles Posted in E2 Visa for Israelis

In this video, attorneys Jacob Sapochnick and Marie Puertollano join a live session on Facebook and Youtube to cover the latest in immigration, E-2 visa changes, TN visa updates, as well as tips, tricks, and advice on how to protect yourself amid this changing immigration climate.

Overview: 

Revised NTA Policy and Delayed implementation:

USCIS has revised its NTA policy expanding the class of individuals who may be referred to ICE and issued a Notice to Appear. Under the revised policy, USCIS may now refer cases “with articulated suspicions of fraud to ICE prior to adjudication.” The implementation of this policy has been placed on hold until operational guidance is implemented by immigration.

What will the new policy do?

The new policy prioritizes the removal of aliens who are removable based on criminal or security grounds, fraud or misrepresentation, and aliens subject to expedited removal.

Prioritizes the removal of individuals who:

  • (a) Have been convicted of any criminal offense;
  • (b) Have been charged with any criminal offense that has not been resolved;
  • (c) Have committed acts that constitute a chargeable criminal offense;
  • (d) Have engaged in fraud or willful misrepresentation in connection with any official matter or application before a governmental agency;
  • (e) Have abused any program related to receipt of public benefits;
  • (f) Are subject to a final order of removal, but have not departed; or
  • (g) In the judgment of an immigration officer, otherwise pose a risk to public safety or national security

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Overview: 

What is an E-2 visa?

The E-2 treaty investor visa is a non-immigrant visa that allows foreign entrepreneurs from treaty nations to enter the United States and carry out investment and trade activities, for a specified period of two years subject to renewal. Investment activities include the creation of a new business. Foreign nationals must invest a substantial amount of capital in a new or existing business. The investment must be significantly proportional to the total investment, that is, usually more than half the total value of the enterprise or, if a new business, an amount normally considered necessary to establish the business.

Who can get it?

Only foreign nationals from treaty nations may apply for the E-2 visa. To find out if your country qualifies, click here.

Level of Investment

Therefore, the level of investment must be such that it is sufficient to justify presence of the treaty national in the United States. The investment must be in an operating business e.g. a speculative investment in undeveloped land would not qualify, whereas an investment in a real estate development project probably would. Also, a substantial part of the investment must have been made prior to applying for E-2 status.

Key Points

  • The investment must be substantial, a standard which depends on the nature of the enterprise. Generally, investment funds or assets must be committed and irrevocable. The funds or assets must be deemed sufficient to ensure the success of operations.
  • The investment must be real and active and not passive; this means that a bank account, undeveloped land or stocks, or a not-for-profit organization will not be sufficient to be considered.
  • The enterprise must be a real, operating commercial enterprise or active entrepreneurial undertaking productive of some service or commodity. Paper organizations, speculative, or idle investments do not qualify as real operating enterprises or active entrepreneurial undertakings. Funds in a bank account are not considered at risk since they have not been committed.

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In this video attorney Jacob Sapochnick discusses the status of the E-2 visa program for the country of Israel, as well as different E visa options for Israeli entrepreneurs. For a free first time consultation please contact our office.

Our staff members are fluent in Spanish, Hebrew, Russian, Mandarin, and French.

Please remember to follow us on Facebook, Youtube, Twitter, and Instagram.

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It is our pleasure to introduce you to our talented senior paralegal Linda Parrish. Linda Parrish is the senior paralegal for immigration and corporate matters at our law office. Altogether, she has more than 20 years experience in the legal field and brings an amazing amount of knowledge and expertise to our firm. She focuses on  company formations, E2 and L1 visas as well as PERM Green Card cases.

Linda has been working with the Law Offices of Jacob J. Sapochnick since 2005.  Linda has extensive knowledge of all aspects of immigration law, though her specialty lies in assisting investors, executives, and corporate clients to meet their immigration needs. She is also our resident Notary Public. Linda Parrish is an asset to our team for her expertise, kindness, and for the invaluable contributions she has made to our firm.

Mrs. Parrish is married, has four adult children and several grandchildren. In her spare time, she enjoys quilting and crocheting.

For read more about our team please click here.

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In this video, Attorney Jacob J. Sapochnick Esq. discusses one of your frequently asked questions about the E-2 visa program: Is there a minimum investment amount? How can I determine how much money to invest for the E-2 visa?

For more information please keep watching.

Overview: 

The answer is that there is no set standard requirement in the law stating a standard minimum amount of money required to be invested in order to qualify for an E-2 visa. Although there is no minimum investment amount required for E-2 visa investment purposes, as a general rule the investment must be significantly proportional to the amount of the total investment. This means that generally the investment amount must be half the total value of the enterprise, or for new businesses, an amount normally considered necessary to start the business. It is true that some applicants have been approved for the E-2 visa having made investments of less than $100,000, but the appropriate amount you must invest will depend on various factors including: the type of business you will invest in, the location, business plan, whether you plan on opening a new business or investment in an existing business, etc. In order for your application to be convincing, realistically the investment amount should approach $100,000, to increase your chances of getting your E-2 visa approved, but you must take into account that the investment amount will depend upon many different factors.

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In this video, Attorney Jacob J. Sapochnick Esq. discusses one of your frequently asked questions: Is there a minimum investment amount required to apply for the E-2 Treaty Investor visa? To read more about the E-2 visa click here. To read about other visa types for start-up companies and entrepreneurs please click here.

Overview: 

Although, there is no minimum investment amount required for the E-2 Treaty Trader Visa, the investment amount must be reasonable, to demonstrate that the business is not marginal and that it is the funds will be “at risk.”

As a general rule the investment must be significantly proportional to the total investment, that is, usually more than half the total value of the enterprise or, for new businesses, an amount normally considered necessary to establish the business.

Consider the following when coming up with the appropriate investment amount:

  • What is the type of business?
  • Where is the location?
  • How much money is typically required to run this type of business?
  • How many employees will you need to hire?
  • Consider cost of assets, equipment, operating, and other start up expenses

Typically, anything less than $50,000 would not be sufficient to convince the consulate or immigration service that your funds are committed and “at risk.” We would be happy to discuss your options. For a free first time consultation please contact our office.

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In this segment, attorney Jacob Sapochnick Esq., addresses common E visa myths and the facts surrounding the E visa program.

Overview: 

Here are the common myths and misconceptions that clients have about the E visa program:

The first myth is that you need to invest more than $100,000 to be able to obtain the E visa. This is not true. According to the law, in order to qualify for an E visa, the investment amount must be reasonable. The amount you will invest will depend on the type of business you trying to set up. For example, if you are interested in starting a consulting company, a reasonable amount would be $50,000 or higher depending on your expenses. If you are looking to start a restaurant, $50,000 would likely not be enough to cover your expenses. When considering how much money to invest, you must first determine the kind of business you want to invest in, and how much money you will need to properly set up the business and cover your expenses. We recommend that investors develop a 5-year business plan to explain how the investment funds will be allocated to cover the company’s expenses over an extended period of time. The business plan will also project the company’s growth and other important factors.

Keep in mind that the lower the amount is that you have invested in the business, the more you are going to have to spend from that money, before the case is filed with USCIS. Before a case is submitted to USCIS, most of the money must be invested in the new company, to show USCIS that your investment is committed and at risk.

The second myth is that investment in real estate qualifies for the E visa program. Unfortunately, investing in real estate is not sufficient for E visa purposes. To qualify for the E visa program, the new business must be active. Additionally, you must demonstrate to USCIS that new jobs will be created for Americans and that the company will generate revenues in the future.

Another question that typically comes up is whether E visa holders can work from home. In some cases, yes E visa holders may be able to work from home. We strongly advise against this. The more documented evidence the E visa holder can provide USCIS to prove that their investment is at risk, the higher the likelihood that the E visa will be approved. If you are running your business from home, there may be a presumption that you are minimizing your investment, and that your investment is not at risk. It is typically discouraged to set up the business from home for this reason.

Another common question is whether an investor can move money to the US, and upon approval of the E visa, transfer the money back to a foreign account. The answer is no. The money that you invest in the new company must be committed and at risk. If you transfer the money abroad once your E visa has been approved, you will not be able to extend your E visa, and you may potentially run the risk of being investigated by USCIS for fraud.

Overall there is no set amount that you need to invest, you cannot invest in real estate for E visa purposes, and it is not recommended that you work from home.

To learn more about the E visa, and other work visas please click here. Please call our office for a free consultation.

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In this segment, attorney Jacob Sapochnick Esq., explains why we do what we do at the Law Offices of Jacob J. Sapochnick. For more information about our office and the services we provide please click here.

Overview: 

Since 2004, we have efficiently and conveniently served our clients located across the United States and around the world through the use of cutting-edge technology and other innovations, always maintaining the personal connection you have come to expect from us.

You can express your interest, or schedule an appointment by emailing us at info@h1b.biz. We are excited to expand our ability to help many more of you, as you seek to achieve your American dream of living and working in this great country, a nation of immigrants.

Looking back, it is hard to narrow the reasons for our firm’s success. So much goes into that, but the main three ingredients have to be the lawyers, staff and clients. I am amazed at the enduring relationships we have with our clients.

Our office has been blessed with a staff that is motivated, efficient and very capable. I also think it important that they are compassionate for our clients’ issues – this is more than a job for us all – it is a calling.

To learn more about our dedicated staff members please click here.

Connect with us on Facebook, Youtube, Twitter, and Instagram.

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In this episode, attorney Jacob J. Sapochnick, discusses one of our most frequently asked questions: What is the importance of Business Plans for E-visas and how can they improve an E-visa application?

For further questions please call our office.

Remember to follow us on FacebookYoutubeTwitter, and Instagram. For more information please visit our website. 

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In this video Attorney Jacob J Sapochnick Esq., explains one of our most frequently asked questions: Can I get a Green Card from an E2 Visa?

While there is no direct way to convert an E2 Visa to a Green Card, there are ways to get a Green Card from an E2. Normally E2 Visas are non immigrant visas, so the intention is to return to the home country one way.

You are eligible to apply for a Green Card while under E-2 status as long as you meet the guidelines through one of the following methods:

  • EB-1 Green Card: You can obtain a green card while under E-2 status if you are an “Alien of Extraordinary ability” or a “Multinational Manager or Executive.” If you find yourself in one of these categories, you can file an immigration petition under one of these categories
  • Family Based Immigration Green Card: You may obtain a green card if you have close relatives in the United States. Your relatives may file a petition in this case.
  • National Interest Waiver: If you are an “alien of exceptional ability,” have an advanced degree or an equivalent level of experience, and can show that your services will greatly benefit the United States, then you may file a National Interest Waiver (NIW).
  • Employment Based Immigration: If you can find an employer who is willing to file a Labor Certification form with the Department of Labor, then you may qualify for a green card through the employment based immigration process. Or Self Petition EB2 based on a self petitioned H1B.
  • EB5 Visa – Green Card based on investment of 500K or Million depending on the location in the US.

For more information on this subject contact our office and please remember to follow us on FacebookYoutubeTwitter, and Instagram 

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