Articles Posted in Overstays

In this video attorney Jacob J. Sapochnick answers your immigration questions live on Facebook.

Posted by San Diego Immigration Lawyer, Jacob J. Sapochnick on Saturday, February 18, 2017

In this session, Jacob discusses what is new in immigration, and answers your immigration questions relating to applications for permanent residence (I-485 adjustment of status), H-1B visas, citizenship, traveling outside of the United States as a permanent resident, global delays in visa issuance, the future of DACA under the Trump administration, consequences of overstaying your visa, and much more.

Please remember to follow us on FacebookYoutubeTwitter, and Instagram to catch our next live stream. If you have any questions please contact our office or e-mail jacob@h1b.biz.

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In this video, attorney Jacob J. Sapochnick Esq. answers one of your frequently asked questions: I overstayed my visa and I am now married to a U.S. Citizen. Am I eligible for a green card?

Overview: 

I am married to a US Citizen but I came to the United States over 10 years ago, I overstayed my visa. Am I eligible to apply for a green card?

The good news is, even if you have overstayed or worked in the United States illegally,  if you are married to a US Citizen it is possible to legalize and apply for permanent residence. The key to determine your eligibility lies in the manner in which you entered the United States. To be eligible for permanent residence, you must have been inspected by a U.S. Customs Official at a U.S. Port of entry. In other words, you must have entered the United States legally and received an I-94 record of arrival/departure proving that you were inspected upon entry. If all goes well, the immigration officer will waive the overstay and illegal employment, at the time of your marriage interview if you can prove that you were inspected by showing your I-94. Any other grounds of inadmissability such as certain crimes, fraud, or willful misrepresentation may subject you to a bar for a certain period of time. In these circumstances, you will need to obtain a waiver before applying for permanent residence.

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